Archives For Chinese New Year

The Year of the Pig

April 15, 2019 — Leave a comment

Recently I returned from a trip in China right after their Spring Festival, which marks the start of their Lunar New Year. As you may know, there are a dozen characters that make up the revolving zodiac representatives of each new year. Many in China can tell your age, if you tell them which zodiac animal represented the year in which you were born. Would you like to know which year’s animal represented the year in which I was born?

The Year of the Pig | BeauSides.com

That is right! I was born in the year of the pig! Can you see the resemblance? With my eating habits and the way I kept my college room, well, the irony is overwhelming!

The Year of the Pig | BeauSides.com

Pigs are apparently playful, as you can see here and in the next photo! Who knew?

The Year of the Pig | BeauSides.com

The culture in China would dictate that I wear the color red often this entire year. You should have good luck when it is the year of the animal representing the year you were born, and you should wear red clothes frequently! That enhances your good luck, and maybe people will notice this is your year!

Oh, and one last photo of a cool pig indeed!

The Year of the Pig | BeauSides.com

Happy Year of the Pig!

In China, by far the largest holiday is the Lunar New Year, called the Spring Festival or Chun Jie in Chinese. It is based on the moon, so it doesn’t happen on the same day each year. It occurs at the end of January or the first of February. Some of the main customs surrounding Chun Jie are cleaning your home, eating jaozi (dumplings,) and parents giving a child a red envelope full of money. A couple of the lesser-known traditions involve getting a haircut and taking a shower to wash away anything bad.

As you would imagine, in China there will be lots of fireworks all day and night surrounding their holiday, or at least that is how it was in the past. Now there is a ban on fireworks, which is being done to improve the air quality. Honestly, that will be a hard ban to enforce!

Many people receive an extended vacation to celebrate this huge holiday. In fact, it is known as the largest annual migration of people, when all of the city workers travel back to their rural hometowns to visit their families.

This new year is called the year of the dog, and gou is how you say dog in Chinese. I will display a paper cut-out symbol for the year of the dog for you to enjoy.

happy-new-year

Happy Spring Festival to all of my Chinese friends!

 

Happy New Year!

February 19, 2015 — Leave a comment

In China, by far the largest holiday is the Lunar New Year, called the Spring Festival or Chun Jie in Chinese. It is based on the moon, so it doesn’t happen on the same day each year. It usually occurs at the end of January or the beginning of February. Some of the main customs surrounding Chun Jie are cleaning your home, eating jaozi (dumplings), and parents giving a child a red envelope full of money. A couple of the lesser known traditions involve getting a haircut and taking a shower to wash away anything bad. As you can imagine, in China there will be lots of fireworks all day and night surrounding the holiday.

Many people receive an extended vacation to celebrate this huge holiday. In fact, it is known as the largest annual migration of people when all of the city workers travel back to their rural hometowns to visit their families.

This year is called the year of the goat. “Shanyang” is how you say goat in Chinese. I will display a beautiful symbol for the year of the goat for you to enjoy. The Lunar New Year falls on 02/19 for 2015!

023a_SpringFestival2015

Happy Spring Festival to all of my Chinese friends!

Shanghai Signage

September 30, 2014 — Leave a comment

There is something that international travelers have come to anticipate and enjoy, and that is how signs are used and translated.  Some signs are humorous because the words chosen are very flowery and show a great vocabulary, but most native speakers wouldn’t have chosen to use those words.  Also, some signs just aren’t translated very well, which can always bring a smile to a travelers face.  Another category of signs that may catch your eye are ones that deal with certain subject matter.

Shanghai_008a_TheSigns

As you may recall, China has faced health challenges from SARS and Avian Flu. That is the reason for the sign pictured above.  When you consider China’s population density, you can understand why the leaders of China want to protect the people from an outbreak of illness.

Shanghai_008b_TheSigns

We all know the universal sign for “NO,” but this is one sign I found particularly interesting.  I don’t know about you, but (in the states) I can’t think of many places where people light fireworks in public.  Unless you have been in China, this sign may seem unnecessary to you. Even so, it is very much needed in the Chinese culture.  Fireworks are very common for holidays, weddings, and the grand opening of a new business.  Americans are often amazed by how many fireworks are used in China—especially for the Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival as it is called in China.

Happy New Year!

January 30, 2014 — Leave a comment

In China, the largest holiday, by far, is the Lunar New Year or what we call Chinese New Year in America. It’s called the Spring Festival or Chun Jie in China. The holiday is based on the moon, so it doesn’t happen on the same day each year. It occurs at the end of January or the first of February.
Happy CNY
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