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It was about this time of year when some students and I took a road trip. Actually, it would be more accurate to say a bus trip. The students were from the university where I was teaching, and we decided to go to a smaller town a little north of our city to have a look one weekend. Would you like to know what we saw?

A Peaceful Environment

There was a small river going through the town, and it had this interesting looking bridge. There was a large park along this area of the river, and we enjoyed some street food while sitting in the park. We consumed our glass noodles while eating them out of a clear plastic bag; my first time for doing that. Glass noodles are slippery, and you don’t want to poke a hole in the plastic bag with your chopsticks!

As we walked around town, I saw something that surprised me. They had an old stone wheel for grinding wheat, which is grown locally. I have seen one that used a donkey walking around in a circle to move the stone, but this one used man power. You can see it in the photograph below.

A Peaceful Environment

Some things I also enjoyed seeing in China were the many pools of water with beautiful water lilies in them. I was impressed with the different colors of the lilies, and many times there would be koi swimming around the lilies!

a-peaceful-environment-3

This was an enjoyable trip for many reasons! This particular area of China enjoyed a much slower pace of life compared to when I was teaching in Beijing!

Maybe this blog will help you remember a calm and peaceful place you have enjoyed. I know it certainly has done that for me!

Wheat

July 10, 2014 — Leave a comment

If you are fortunate enough to travel in China, I want to encourage you to keep your eyes open: you never know what you might see! While visiting one city near a mountain many people like to climb, I saw how, when it is time to harvest the wheat, local farmers will spread the wheat on the road, dirt or paved, and let the traffic thresh the wheat. I had never seen that done before, but it made sense to me. As I got closer to the mountain, I was walking down a dirt alley and came across another way to process the wheat. This stone wheel made me wonder how old it was and how hard it must be to manually move the wheel over the wheat.  I think I have seen a larger one of these before; it was large enough to use a horse or donkey to make it work. Wheat07102014